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Rare Throwback: Lil’ Kim Performs “Queen Bitch” + Interview (Talks Death Of 2Pac - 1997)

Cocaine Raps & Mindstates: Lil Kim Speaks on ‘Hard Core 2K14′
One of the most iconic female artists in the business just released a new project on September 11th. Her name is Kimberly Jones aka Lil Kim and the mixtape is Hard Core 2K14.
The Brooklyn-native’s undeniable classic of the same name, Hard Core, shook the industry in 1996. It transformed the game in a way that many never imagined could be done by a female artist. From the street-life associations to the sex kitten imagery and content, Lil Kim burst the bubble in which female rappers were previously placed in. Her true life experiences were spilled out into the radio waves and club speakers in ways that had some music enthusiasts caught off guard. But, the fact that she was unique, is what made her reign above all others.
From Junior Mafia up to now, Lil Kim’s persona has grown into this iconic figure that millions now love, support, and wouldn’t hesitate going to war for. On her new mixtape, Hard Core 2K14 maintains that same feeling as the original album. As stated by the Queen Bee herself, her first project contained that “crack.”  This is what made that album so addictive. For Hard Core 2K14, the goal was to give fans that same feeling. And it does.
Hard Core 2K14 does not boast a lot of features. However, Lil Kim’s last project dropped in 2011 so it’s been a while since we’ve heard her spit that hard sh*t on her own accord. To help with the project though, she did enlist a few veterans: Yo Gotti, Jadakiss, French Montana, and Cassidy.  The mixtape has a total of 12 songs, which includes stand out tracks “Stadium”, “Real Sick”, “Identity Theft”, “Migo”, “Dead Gal Walking”, “Kimmie Blanco”, and “Haterz.”
To find out more about the mixtape and the motivation behind it, we were granted an opportunity to conduct an exclusive interview with Lil Kim. During our conversation, she talked about Hard Core 2K14, “cocaine raps”, and her mental space now versus back when she first entered the game. Read our interview below…

What inspired you to bring back the “Hard Core” title of your mixtape? Also, what was the reason why you wanted to give fans an updated version of the original?

Well, my fans kept saying that you should do something that’s Hard Core inspired. You know, those are my fans, number one. They are my day ones. And it was Fendi’s idea to recreate that whole movement. So, I thought it was genius on his behalf and on my fans behalf. You know, why not?!
I never in any way, and in any shape or form, thought that I was going to recreate another classic like Hard Core. That’s not the plan. That wasn’t the plan. I wasn’t trying to make a “Queen B@$#H” part 5 or a “Drugs” part 2. I just wanted to give them that feel that they got with Hard Core.  Which is, I call it “cocaine raps” mixed with umm…’cause you know I got to give them that crack and cook it up. I call it that [crack] and mixed with the sexy, sexy, sex symbol Kim. And I think that was the feel for Hard Core, to me. It’s hard core.

ME: Well, I listened to the project and I definitely got the same feeling from it. You know, the “cocaine music” content and the sexiness.

Yeah. But let me clear up this “cocaine music.” [laughs]
Well, you know nowadays you call your music “crack,” or anything you do. If you were a sewer and you make clothes, and you know you are about to make the most bomb leggings you’ve ever made in your life, that would be your “crack.”  You get it??

ME: Right!

That’s basically what it is and that’s basically how I looked at Hard Core 2K14 and the first Hard Core as well. You know, the drugs you have to have. And that’s how Hard Core was. That CD was like drugs. People used to tell me all the time, “Oh Kim, I just can’t keep a hard core CD in my car. My aunt stole my first one. My sister stole my second one. Now, I just bought a third one. And my friend just stole it.” So, you know it’s just like…I call it that.
Also, it relate to a lot of girls coming up in the hood. The type of guys we might have dated, the things we might have done as young girls in the hood. That’s what I think Hard Core 2K14 has in common with the original Hard Core album.

Can you describe the mental space you were in when you dropped Hard Core in 1996 versus the mental space that you are in now?

When I made my very first record, which was “Player’s Anthem” for the Junior Mafia project, I was 17. When I made “Get Money,” I had just turned 18. I was old enough to find my own deal. When we first did “Player’s Anthem” they were like, “Oh we’re getting ready to get a record deal.” When we recorded “Player’s Anthem,” we didn’t have a record deal yet. But, I knew that song was just going to be a hit. And when we finally got our record deal, I had just turned 18. I was able to sign my own contract because before that they were saying we have to have our moms come sign with us, you know. My mom didn’t even know what I was doing at the time. I didn’t want to tell her because I didn’t know how she was going to react, you know, because it was “hard core.” [laughs]
I think then I was just a baby. I was a baby. I really didn’t understand what was happening. We blew up so quick as kids. We were just on the block, then all of a sudden we in front of cameras and 33,000 people crowds. It was like then my mind set was like, “OK, I’m an entertainer now.”  I just started moving as an entertainer. I got it at a young age. I got what was going on after things started happening. But, then it was just like OK. I had a lot of male influences in my life when I was making those albums coming up. And now it just me being my own boss.


For those wondering if she’s going to hit the road, yes she is. Lil Kim says she does plan to go on a promo tour in honor of the new mixtape. Although the exact dates aren’t scheduled yet, she says that Atlanta, Philly, D.C., Virginia and Baltimore were the first cities that ever embraced Hard Core. So, if you live in those places, there’s a strong possibility that Lil Kim will stop there.
Until then, you can check her out at the Barclay Center in New York on the 20th. She will be a part of a special event put on by The Source magazine.
Download the mixtape now at www.LilKim.com and follow Lil Kim on Instagram @LilKimTheQueenBee !
http://www.stacksmag.net/2014/09/exclusive-cocaine-raps-mindstates-lil-kim-speaks-hard-core-2k14.html

Cocaine Raps & Mindstates: Lil Kim Speaks on ‘Hard Core 2K14′

One of the most iconic female artists in the business just released a new project on September 11th. Her name is Kimberly Jones aka Lil Kim and the mixtape is Hard Core 2K14.

The Brooklyn-native’s undeniable classic of the same name, Hard Core, shook the industry in 1996. It transformed the game in a way that many never imagined could be done by a female artist. From the street-life associations to the sex kitten imagery and content, Lil Kim burst the bubble in which female rappers were previously placed in. Her true life experiences were spilled out into the radio waves and club speakers in ways that had some music enthusiasts caught off guard. But, the fact that she was unique, is what made her reign above all others.

From Junior Mafia up to now, Lil Kim’s persona has grown into this iconic figure that millions now love, support, and wouldn’t hesitate going to war for. On her new mixtape, Hard Core 2K14 maintains that same feeling as the original album. As stated by the Queen Bee herself, her first project contained that “crack.”  This is what made that album so addictive. For Hard Core 2K14, the goal was to give fans that same feeling. And it does.

Hard Core 2K14 does not boast a lot of features. However, Lil Kim’s last project dropped in 2011 so it’s been a while since we’ve heard her spit that hard sh*t on her own accord. To help with the project though, she did enlist a few veterans: Yo Gotti, Jadakiss, French Montana, and Cassidy.  The mixtape has a total of 12 songs, which includes stand out tracks “Stadium”, “Real Sick”, “Identity Theft”, “Migo”, “Dead Gal Walking”, “Kimmie Blanco”, and “Haterz.”

To find out more about the mixtape and the motivation behind it, we were granted an opportunity to conduct an exclusive interview with Lil Kim. During our conversation, she talked about Hard Core 2K14, “cocaine raps”, and her mental space now versus back when she first entered the game. Read our interview below…

What inspired you to bring back the “Hard Core” title of your mixtape? Also, what was the reason why you wanted to give fans an updated version of the original?

Well, my fans kept saying that you should do something that’s Hard Core inspired. You know, those are my fans, number one. They are my day ones. And it was Fendi’s idea to recreate that whole movement. So, I thought it was genius on his behalf and on my fans behalf. You know, why not?!

I never in any way, and in any shape or form, thought that I was going to recreate another classic like Hard Core. That’s not the plan. That wasn’t the plan. I wasn’t trying to make a “Queen B@$#H” part 5 or a “Drugs” part 2. I just wanted to give them that feel that they got with Hard Core.  Which is, I call it “cocaine raps” mixed with umm…’cause you know I got to give them that crack and cook it up. I call it that [crack] and mixed with the sexy, sexy, sex symbol Kim. And I think that was the feel for Hard Core, to me. It’s hard core.

ME: Well, I listened to the project and I definitely got the same feeling from it. You know, the “cocaine music” content and the sexiness.

Yeah. But let me clear up this “cocaine music.” [laughs]

Well, you know nowadays you call your music “crack,” or anything you do. If you were a sewer and you make clothes, and you know you are about to make the most bomb leggings you’ve ever made in your life, that would be your “crack.”  You get it??

ME: Right!

That’s basically what it is and that’s basically how I looked at Hard Core 2K14 and the first Hard Core as well. You know, the drugs you have to have. And that’s how Hard Core was. That CD was like drugs. People used to tell me all the time, “Oh Kim, I just can’t keep a hard core CD in my car. My aunt stole my first one. My sister stole my second one. Now, I just bought a third one. And my friend just stole it.” So, you know it’s just like…I call it that.

Also, it relate to a lot of girls coming up in the hood. The type of guys we might have dated, the things we might have done as young girls in the hood. That’s what I think Hard Core 2K14 has in common with the original Hard Core album.

Can you describe the mental space you were in when you dropped Hard Core in 1996 versus the mental space that you are in now?

When I made my very first record, which was “Player’s Anthem” for the Junior Mafia project, I was 17. When I made “Get Money,” I had just turned 18. I was old enough to find my own deal. When we first did “Player’s Anthem” they were like, “Oh we’re getting ready to get a record deal.” When we recorded “Player’s Anthem,” we didn’t have a record deal yet. But, I knew that song was just going to be a hit. And when we finally got our record deal, I had just turned 18. I was able to sign my own contract because before that they were saying we have to have our moms come sign with us, you know. My mom didn’t even know what I was doing at the time. I didn’t want to tell her because I didn’t know how she was going to react, you know, because it was “hard core.” [laughs]

I think then I was just a baby. I was a baby. I really didn’t understand what was happening. We blew up so quick as kids. We were just on the block, then all of a sudden we in front of cameras and 33,000 people crowds. It was like then my mind set was like, “OK, I’m an entertainer now.”  I just started moving as an entertainer. I got it at a young age. I got what was going on after things started happening. But, then it was just like OK. I had a lot of male influences in my life when I was making those albums coming up. And now it just me being my own boss.

For those wondering if she’s going to hit the road, yes she is. Lil Kim says she does plan to go on a promo tour in honor of the new mixtape. Although the exact dates aren’t scheduled yet, she says that Atlanta, Philly, D.C., Virginia and Baltimore were the first cities that ever embraced Hard Core. So, if you live in those places, there’s a strong possibility that Lil Kim will stop there.

Until then, you can check her out at the Barclay Center in New York on the 20th. She will be a part of a special event put on by The Source magazine.

Download the mixtape now at www.LilKim.com and follow Lil Kim on Instagram @LilKimTheQueenBee !

http://www.stacksmag.net/2014/09/exclusive-cocaine-raps-mindstates-lil-kim-speaks-hard-core-2k14.html

Lil’ Kim, Lil’ Cease & Mr Bristal ("Play Around" Video Shoot -1999)

Lil’ Kim, Lil’ Cease & Mr Bristal ("Play Around" Video Shoot -1999)

Lil’ Kim (1999/2000)

Rare: Lil’ Kim’s Hollyhood Makeover (Pilot Episode - 2004)

This episode was filmed as a pilot back in 2004, but was never picked up by VH1, partially because of Kim’s perjury trial. This has never aired.

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New Pic: Lil’ Kim & DJ Kay Slay

New Pic: Lil’ Kim & DJ Kay Slay

Rare: Lil’ Kim (1996)

Rare: Lil’ Kim (1996)

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